About Chinese acupuncture
Chinese acupuncture London

About Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a traditional healing practice that originated in China thousands of years ago. It involves the insertion of thin needles into specific points on the body, known as acupuncture points or acupoints. These points are located along pathways called meridians, through which vital energy, or qi, flows.

By stimulating these points, acupuncture balances the flow of qi and restores health and well-being. Chinese acupuncture is often used to treat a wide range of conditions, from chronic pain to stress, anxiety, and fertility issues.

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Testimonials

  • Very nice, it cured my shoulder ache

    Martin Sundman Avatar Martin Sundman
    April 17, 2024
  • Ella treated me for hayfever. I’d never had acupuncture before so was a little nervous but Ella’s relaxed and friendly manner immediately put me at ease. Her light touch and... read more

    hannah simons Avatar hannah simons
    April 17, 2024
  • Ella is a dedicated acupuncturist with a sound holistic approach and the numerous treatments I had with her have helped me a great deal. Apart from that, Ella has given... read more

    B. K. Avatar B. K.
    April 24, 2022
  • Ella Nazar is an excellent acupuncturist. I went in with a laundry list of problems and she helped me with each one. She's incredibly knowledgable and very kind. I always... read more

    Lauren Zableckis Avatar Lauren Zableckis
    April 24, 2022
  • I was suffering from sciatic pain for a long time and Ella is making my life pretty easier now.I highly recommend this professional .

    jacqueline de souza Avatar jacqueline de souza
    April 17, 2024
  • Ella är en skicklig akupunktör och engagerad i kinesiskt medicin. Hon gjorde en helhetsbedömning av mitt hälsotillstånd och utförde akupunkturen därefter. Jag kan varmt rekommendera Ella.

    Lilli Sundman Avatar Lilli Sundman
    April 17, 2024
  • Ella has helped me so much in regards to long standing kidney and urinary tract issues . My odema has gone down significantally and my overall health has improved drastically.... read more

    X Avatar X
    April 18, 2024
  • Ella is incredibly kind and caring, she has been treating my daughter who is a national level swimmer for rhinitis and menstrual cramps. The cramps have totally gone and we... read more

    Louisa Fielding Avatar Louisa Fielding
    April 17, 2024
  • Ive been seeing Ella for long Covid symptoms over the last few months. She’s been so supportive, strengthening me with acupuncture, increasing my energy levels and helping with my digestion.... read more

    Rina Kanani Avatar Rina Kanani
    April 24, 2022
  • Ihana palvelu, pehmeät parantavat kädet👍Auttoi minua jalkasäryn ja lihasreuman hoidossa. Neulat eivät sattuneet ollenkaan. Suosittelen👍

    Arja Vakkari Avatar Arja Vakkari
    April 17, 2024
Chinese acupuncture

How does acupuncture work?

Acupuncture works by stimulating the body’s nervous system, triggering the release of various biochemical substances such as endorphins, serotonin, and other neurotransmitters. These substances play crucial roles in regulating pain perception, reducing inflammation, and promoting relaxation.

When fine needles are inserted into specific points on the body known as acupuncture points, it prompts sensory nerves to send signals to the brain. This activation of nerve pathways leads to the release of neurotransmitters, which can help modulate pain signals, improve blood flow, and induce a state of relaxation.

Acupuncture has been supported by MRI studies showing its ability to modulate brain activity and neurochemical responses. The Healthcare Medicine Institute summarised research that was published in Autonomic Neuroscience and found that acupuncture affects the brain’s limbic system, which regulates emotions and pain perception. You can read more about it here.

Acupuncture studies

Is acupuncture backed by science?

Yes, acupuncture is backed by a growing body of scientific evidence supporting its efficacy for various conditions. While more research is continually being conducted to further understand its mechanisms and optimise its use, numerous studies have demonstrated positive outcomes.

For example:

Acupuncture has been supported by MRI studies showing its ability to modulate brain activity and neurochemical responses. The Healthcare Medicine Institute summarised research that was published in Autonomic Neuroscience and found that acupuncture affects the brain’s limbic system, which regulates emotions and pain perception. You can read more about it here.

Further research

John McDonald and Stephen Janz, 2017:

  1. In January 2017, John McDonald and Stephen Janz published “The Acupuncture Evidence Project”, reviewing research for all 122 conditions studied in relation to acupuncture.
    • They found evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture for 117 conditions, with stronger evidence for some than others. Acupuncture is considered safe in the hands of a well-trained practitioner and has been found to be cost-effective for some conditions. The quality and quantity of research into acupuncture’s effectiveness are increasing. (McDonald & Janz, 2017) (source)
  2. They found strong evidence for acupuncture, suggesting it is no longer merely attributable to the placebo effect or useful solely for musculoskeletal pain. (Stephen Janz, 2017) (source)

Mel Hopper Koppelman, 2017:

  1. “Acupuncture stimulates peripheral nerves triggering a cascade that causes changes in the brain and the internal organs.”
  2. “Acupuncture stimulates the body to release its own natural pain killers. It also stimulates the release of molecules associated with tissue healing and disease resolution.”
  3. Furthermore, pain-related studies show that acupuncture can still be effective a year later, unlike painkillers.
  4. “Compared to opioids, acupuncture is more effective and much safer for pain.”
  5. Acupuncture trials are thought to underestimate the treatment’s effect compared to patient response in outcome surveys. Sham acupuncture in small groups may not detect significant differences, whereas larger trials have.
  6. A large body of research indicates that acupuncture is more effective than usual care for many conditions. It also significantly outperforms sham acupuncture, demonstrating specific effects.

Mel Hopper Koppelman is the Director of Evidence Based Medicine, an acupuncturist, and strives to make understanding research more straightforward.